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The biomechanics of the human tongue

by jppelteret

Authors: Y. Kajee, J-P. V. Pelteret, and B. D. Reddy

The human tongue is composed mainly of skeletal muscle tissue and has a complex architecture. Its anatomy is characterised by interweaving yet distinct muscle groups. It is a significant contributor to the phenomenon of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. A realistic model of the tongue and computational simulations are important in areas such as linguistics and speech therapy. The aim of this work is to report on the construction of a geometric and constitutive model of the human tongue and to demonstrate its use in computational simulations for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome research. The geometry of the tongue and each muscle group of the tongue, including muscle fibre orientations, are captured from the Visible Human Project dataset. The fully linear muscle model is based on the Hill three-element model that represents the constituent parts of muscle fibres. The mechanics of the model are limited to quasi-static, small-strain, linear-elastic behaviour. The main focus of this work is on the material directionality and muscle activation. The transversely isotropic behaviour of the muscle tissue is accounted for, as well as the influence of muscle activation. The behaviour of the model is illustrated in a number of benchmark tests and for the case of a subject in the supine position. [1]

[1] [pdf] [doi] Y. Kajee, J-P. V. Pelteret, and B. D. Reddy, “The biomechanics of the human tongue,” International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering, vol. 29, iss. 4, pp. 492-514, 2013.
[Bibtex]
@Article{kajee2013a-preprint,
author = {Kajee, Y. and Pelteret, J-P. V. and Reddy, B. D.},
title = {The biomechanics of the human tongue},
journal = {International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering},
year = {2013},
volume = {29},
number = {4},
pages = {492--514},
month = {April},
abstract = {The human tongue is composed mainly of skeletal muscle tissue and has a complex architecture. Its anatomy is characterised by interweaving yet distinct muscle groups. It is a significant contributor to the phenomenon of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome. A realistic model of the tongue and computational simulations are important in areas such as linguistics and speech therapy. The aim of this work is to report on the construction of a geometric and constitutive model of the human tongue and to demonstrate its use in computational simulations for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome research. The geometry of the tongue and each muscle group of the tongue, including muscle fibre orientations, are captured from the Visible Human Project dataset. The fully linear muscle model is based on the Hill three-element model that represents the constituent parts of muscle fibres. The mechanics of the model are limited to quasi-static, small-strain, linear-elastic behaviour. The main focus of this work is on the material directionality and muscle activation. The transversely isotropic behaviour of the muscle tissue is accounted for, as well as the influence of muscle activation. The behaviour of the model is illustrated in a number of benchmark tests and for the case of a subject in the supine position.},
doi = {10.1002/cnm.2531},
file = {kajee2013a-preprint.pdf:PDF/kajee2013a-preprint.pdf:PDF},
keywords = {obstructive sleep apnoea ; human tongue ; hill model ; FEM},
owner = {Jean-Paul Pelteret},
timestamp = {2015.10.11},
}

Computational model of soft tissues in the human upper airway

by jppelteret

Authors: J-P. V. Pelteret, and B. D. Reddy

This paper presents a three-dimensional finite element model of the tongue and surrounding soft tissues with potential application to the study of sleep apnoea and of linguistics and speech therapy. The anatomical data was obtained from the Visible Human Project, and the underlying histological data was also extracted and incorporated into the model. Hyperelastic constitutive models were used to describe the material behaviour, and material incompressibility was accounted for. An active Hill three-element muscle model was used to represent the muscular tissue of the tongue. The neural stimulus for each muscle group was determined through the use of a genetic algorithm-based neural control model. The fundamental behaviour of the tongue under gravitational and breathing-induced loading is investigated. It is demonstrated that, when a time-dependent loading is applied to the tongue, the neural model is able to control the position of the tongue and produce a physiologically realistic response for the genioglossus. [1]

[1] [pdf] [doi] J-P. V. Pelteret and B. D. Reddy, “Computational model of soft tissues in the human upper airway,” International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering, vol. 28, iss. 1, pp. 111-132, 2012.
[Bibtex]
@Article{pelteret2012a-preprint,
author = {Pelteret, J-P. V. and Reddy, B. D.},
title = {Computational model of soft tissues in the human upper airway},
journal = {International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering},
year = {2012},
volume = {28},
number = {1},
pages = {111--132},
month = {January},
abstract = {This paper presents a three-dimensional finite element model of the tongue and surrounding soft tissues with potential application to the study of sleep apnoea and of linguistics and speech therapy. The anatomical data was obtained from the Visible Human Project, and the underlying histological data was also extracted and incorporated into the model. Hyperelastic constitutive models were used to describe the material behaviour, and material incompressibility was accounted for. An active Hill three-element muscle model was used to represent the muscular tissue of the tongue. The neural stimulus for each muscle group was determined through the use of a genetic algorithm-based neural control model. The fundamental behaviour of the tongue under gravitational and breathing-induced loading is investigated. It is demonstrated that, when a time-dependent loading is applied to the tongue, the neural model is able to control the position of the tongue and produce a physiologically realistic response for the genioglossus.},
doi = {10.1002/cnm.1487},
file = {pelteret2012a-preprint.pdf:PDF/pelteret2012a-preprint.pdf:PDF},
keywords = {human upper airway; tongue; muscle model; neural control model; genetic algorithm; finite element method},
owner = {Jean-Paul Pelteret},
timestamp = {2015.10.11},
}