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Workshops and courses attended

2016

  • E. Kuhl, “Introduction to Neuromechanics.” 2016.
    [Bibtex]
    @Conference{workshop-kuhl2016a,
    author = {Kuhl, E.},
    title = {Introduction to Neuromechanics},
    year = {2016},
    eventdate = {2016-08-28},
    venue = {Lehrstuhl f\"{u}r Technische Mechanik, Friedrich-Alexander Universit\"{a}t Erlangen-N\"{u}rnberg},
    url = {http://biomechanics.stanford.edu/Intro_to_neuromechanics_16},
    abstract = {Our brain is not only our softest, but also our least well- understood organ. Floating in the cerebrospinal fluid, embedded in the skull, it is almost perfectly isolated from its mechanical environment. Not surprisingly, most brain research focuses on the electrical rather than the mechanical characteristics of brain tissue. Recent studies suggest though, that the mechanical environment plays an important role in modulating brain function. Neuromechanics has traditionally focused on the extremely fast time scales associated with dynamic phenomena on the order of milliseconds. The prototype example is traumatic brain injury where extreme loading rates cause intracranial damage associated with a temporary or permanent loss of function. Neurodevelopment, on the contrary, falls into the slow time scales associated with quasi-static phenomena on the order of months. A typical example is cortical folding, where compressive forces between gray and white matter induce surface buckling. To understand the role of mechanics in neuroanatomy and neuromorphology, we begin this course by discussing the brains's anatomy and correlate our observations to neurophysiology. We discuss morphological abnormalities including lissencephaly and polymicrogyria and illustrate their morphological similarities with neurological disorders including schizophrenia and autism. Then, we address the role of mechanics during brachycephaly, plagiocephaly, tumor growth, and hydrocephalus. Last, we explore the mechanics of traumatic brain injury with special applications to shaken baby syndrome},
    owner = {Jean-Paul Pelteret},
    timestamp = {2017.05.15},
    }
  • P. Steinmann, D. Lupascu, and F. Endres, “2$^{\text{nd}}$ Seminar on Ferroic Functional Materials & 12$^{\text{th}}$ International Workshop on Direct and Inverse Problems in Piezoelectricity.” 2016.
    [Bibtex]
    @Conference{workshop-steinmann2016a,
    author = {Steinmann, P. and Lupascu, D. and Endres, F.},
    title = {2$^{\text{nd}}$ Seminar on Ferroic Functional Materials \& 12$^{\text{th}}$ International Workshop on Direct and Inverse Problems in Piezoelectricity},
    year = {2016},
    eventdate = {2016-10-04},
    venue = {Lehrstuhl f\"{u}r Technische Mechanik, Friedrich-Alexander Universit\"{a}t Erlangen-N\"{u}rnberg},
    url = {http://www.ltm.uni-erlangen.de/veranstaltungen/FERROICS2016/ferroics.shtml},
    abstract = {The joint seminar is dedicated to the diverse fields of ferroic materials including ferroelectricity, ferromagnetism and combined multiferroic materials. It covers mathematical modeling, experimental methods and industrial applications of ferroic materials and devices.
    Aim of the combined seminar is to contribute to open problems in:
    - numerical simulation (direct and inverse analysis)
    - advanced material characterization
    - discussion of fatigue, damage, cracks and reliability
    - manufacturing processes and
    - performance of piezoelectric devices
    The overall intention of the workshop is to bring together experts from different fields of research such as engineering, applied mathematics, and materials science, as well as from the industrial sector.},
    owner = {Jean-Paul Pelteret},
    timestamp = {2017.05.15},
    }

2015

  • W. Bangerth and B. Turcksin, “Fifth deal.II Users and Developers Workshop.” 2015.
    [Bibtex]
    @Conference{workshop-bangerth2015a,
    author = {Bangerth, W. and Turcksin, B.},
    title = {Fifth deal.II Users and Developers Workshop},
    year = {2015},
    eventdate = {2015-08-03},
    url = {http://dealii.org/workshop-2015/},
    owner = {Jean-Paul Pelteret},
    timestamp = {2017.05.15},
    }
  • D. Schubert and J. Kaschta, “TA – Anwendertreffen Rheologie.” 2015.
    [Bibtex]
    @Conference{workshop-schubert2015a,
    author = {Schubert, D. and Kaschta, J.},
    title = {TA - Anwendertreffen Rheologie},
    year = {2015},
    eventdate = {2015-10-01},
    venue = {Lehrstuhl f\"{u}r Technische Mechanik, Friedrich-Alexander Universit\"{a}t Erlangen-N\"{u}rnberg},
    url = {http://www.tainstruments.com/pdf/Erlangen_Programm2015.pdf},
    owner = {Jean-Paul Pelteret},
    timestamp = {2017.05.15},
    }

2014

  • J. Schröder and P. Wriggers, “CISM course: Advanced Finite Element Technologies.” 2014.
    [Bibtex]
    @Conference{workshop-schroeder2014a,
    author = {Schr\"{o}der, J. and Wriggers, P.},
    title = {CISM course: Advanced Finite Element Technologies},
    year = {2014},
    eventdate = {2014-10-06},
    venue = {Udine, Italy},
    url = {http://www.cism.it/courses/C1414/},
    abstract = {Advanced nite element technolo- gies are essential for the solution of almost all problems in computa- tional mechanics. Many engineering and mathematical approaches of novel nite element methods were developed in recent years in order to improve the capabilities and the reliability of numerical simulations. One of the great attractions of the nite element method is its enor- mous range of applicability. Beside the classical application areas like mechanical, aerospace or civil engi- neering, also elds like e.g. physics, biology and medicine use the mani- fold possibilities of this method. New materials, technologies or produc- tion methods and the optimization of products and components make great demands on the quality and performance of numerical meth- ods for the solution of the arising, mainly nonlinear, problems. These demands led to many interesting developments in a wide eld of nite element methods, e.g. (adaptive) mixed and enhanced nite element methods as well as stabilized or dis- continuous Galerkin schemes. Their application often aims at improved or robust discretizations that are superior to standard nite element methods, which often do not pro- vide reliable solutions for nonlinear problems, and, sometimes, collapse completely.
    The objective of the course is to present an overview of the state of research of advanced nite element technologies. The course will cover some of the most important applica- tion areas in modern element tech- nologies ranging from element de- velopment in engineering to math- ematical analysis. The audience is introduced into new methods and technologies under consideration of ef ciency, robustness and perfor- mance. Therefore, the challenging discretization methods will be devel- oped and fundamental mathemati- cal analysis for reliable simulations will be discussed. The special top- ics of the course are mathematical foundations for variational formula- tions, a deep mathematical under- standing of the analytical require- ments of modern FEM approaches for nite deformations and related adaptive strategies, incompress- ible, isotropic or anisotropic mate- rial behavior, the mathematical and numerical treatment of the well- known locking phenomenon and domains with oscillating coef cients. Furthermore, new results within the nite element development and discretization schemes for the ad- equate approximation of all process variables in nonlinear engineering applications under consideration of extreme cases will be discussed.
    The course is intended for doctoral and postdoctoral researchers in civil and mechanical engineering, ap- plied mathematics and physics as well as industrial researchers, which are interested in the topic. After the course participants will have a ba- sic knowledge of advanced mixed Galerkin FEM, least-squares FEM, discontinuous Galerkin methods, mathematical analysis (e.g. con- vergence, ellipticity and coercivity, algebraic interpretation and modern adaptive strategies) as well as for- mulations and applications of these methods to nite (in-)elastic prob- lems. The course is a must for all that are interested and/or involved in advanced nite element tech- nologies.},
    owner = {Jean-Paul Pelteret},
    timestamp = {2017.05.15},
    }

2013

  • L. Dorfmann and R. Ogden, “CISM course: Nonlinear Mechanics of Soft Fibrous Materials.” 2013.
    [Bibtex]
    @Conference{workshop-dorfmann2013a,
    author = {Dorfmann, L. and Ogden, R.},
    title = {CISM course: Nonlinear Mechanics of Soft Fibrous Materials},
    year = {2013},
    eventdate = {2013-07-01},
    venue = {Udine, Italy},
    url = {http://www.cism.it/courses/C1307/},
    abstract = {Soft brous materials are composites with highly exible laments embedded in a soft base matrix. They are found
    in many biological tissues and high performance elastomeric polymers. The bers attribute the material with preferred directions thereby optimizing a set of mechanical properties. There are many applications where natural or synthetic bers are used to modify the mechanical response of the base material. Most broadly, biological materials are reinforced with some kind of proteins, such as collagen, silk, bronectin, titin, and many others. Synthetic bers are most often long chemically cross-linked elastomeric laments, which in the unstretched state occupy a random coiled con guration. When stretched, the filaments extend and orient along the loading directions resulting
    in a decrease of entropy. Depending on processing, the macromolecular orientation
    can be altered resulting in high stiffness and high strength bers. These are used as reinforcements for tires, ropes, cables, ballistic protections used by law enforcement agencies. Biological and engineered reinforced materials are therefore characterized by one or two families of bers creating preferred directions
    in the mechanical response. Mathematical models and numerical simulations are a prerequisite in the development, testing and evaluation of the mechanical properties and
    play a fundamental role in the analysis of problems that arise in such materials.
    The purpose of the course is
    to present a state-of-the-art overview of the fundamental theories, established models and ongoing research related to the modeling of these materials. Two approaches
    are conventionally used to develop constitutive relations for highly deformable brous materials. According to the phenomenological approach, a strain energy density function can be de ned in terms of strain invariants. The other approach is based on kinetic theories, which treats a fibrous material as a randomly oriented inter-tangled network of long molecular chains bridged by permanent and temporary junctions. At the micro-level, these are associated with chemical crosslinks and active entanglements, respectively. The presentations will include carefully crafted overviews of the fundamental formulation
    of the three-dimensional theory from several points of view, and will address their equivalences and differences. We will also include solutions to boundary-value problems which are amenable to experimental veri cation. A further aspect of the course will be the elasticity of laments, stability of equilibrium and thermodynamics of the molecular network theory.
    The course is addressed to doctoral students and postdoctoral researchers in mechanical, civil and electrical engineering, materials science, applied physics and applied mathematics, academic and industrial researchers and practicing engineers.},
    owner = {Jean-Paul Pelteret},
    timestamp = {2017.05.15},
    }
  • J. Mergheim, “Workshop in Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities: Modelling of self-healing materials.” 2013.
    [Bibtex]
    @Conference{workshop-mergheim2013a,
    author = {Mergheim, J.},
    title = {Workshop in Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities: Modelling of self-healing materials},
    year = {2013},
    eventdate = {2013-09-20},
    venue = {Munich, Germany},
    url = {http://www.ltm.uni-erlangen.de/forschung/publikationen/jahresberichte/2013.pdf},
    owner = {Jean-Paul Pelteret},
    timestamp = {2017.05.16},
    }

2012

  • M. Kuttel, J. Gain, C. Laidler, P. Marais, and B. Merry, “Desktop high performance computing.” 2012.
    [Bibtex]
    @Conference{course-kuttel2012a,
    author = {Kuttel, M. and Gain, J. and Laidler, C. and Marais, P. and Merry, B.},
    title = {Desktop high performance computing},
    year = {2012},
    eventdate = {2012-04-23},
    venue = {University of Cape Town, South Africa},
    owner = {Jean-Paul Pelteret},
    timestamp = {2017.05.15},
    }